Haines & Maassen Metallhandelsgesellschaft mbH



Low Melting Alloys based on Bismuth, Indium or Gallium

Low melting alloys are defined as alloys with a melting point well below that of tin. Most of these alloys are based on the metals bismuth and indium, in several cases also on gallium. Some of the standard alloys are listed below. Haines & Maassen Metallhandelsgesellschaft has many of these alloys on stock and supplies them at low prices, even in small quantities. Of course we supply only premium alloys to agreed specifications. Many other alloys (according to customers’ requirements) can also be delivered in small quantities at short notice.

Indium based alloys

Alloy

Melting Range

Features

Indium bismuth eutectic

72°C

Possible use as an alternative to Wood's metal,
an alloy without lead and cadmium,
RoHS-compliant, density 8.56 g/cm³.     

This alloy can also be supplied in form of 1.5 mm
wire.      

Field's metal (indium,

bismuth, tin) eutectic

60°C/ 62°C

Possible use as an alternative to Wood's metal,
an alloy without lead and cadmium,
RoHS-compliant, slightly cheaper
than InBi eutectic 7.88 g/cm³.

Bismuth based alloys

Alloy Melting Range Features

Wood's metal

(bismuth, lead, cadmium, tin)

71°C

Traditional low melting alloy, 9.67 g/cm³

Rose's Metal

(bismuth, lead, tin)

abt. 94 – 105°C

Similar to Wood's metal but without cadmium.
The melting temperature varies by
several degrees depending on the exact
composition.
9.32 g/cm³

Bismuth tin eutectic

138°C

Has a higher melting temperature than
the above alloys. Produces delicate casts
which are quite stable even in filigree forms
and usually have a metallic silvery finish.

8.56 g/ cm³

Gallium based alloys

Alloy Melting Range Features

Gallium

29,8°C

Not an alloy but should also be considered
due to its low melting point.
Please click on Gallium for more info.

Gallium indium alloys

10 – 25°C

Delivered in PE bottles,
tends to form an oxide layer
and then turn black.

Corrosive to some metals
in particular to light metals.

Gallium indium tin (zinc) alloys  

Below 10°C

Even lower melting range.
Delivered in PE bottles,
tends to form an oxide layer
and then turn black.

Corrosive to some metals
in particular to light metals.

 

The applications and advantages of these alloys are as varied as the alloys:

-       Fuses in fire detectors (sprinkler installations)

-       Mould construction (easy workability, easy melting)

-       Deformation of plastic (low temperature stress)

-       Bending of tubes and hollow parts, which are lined with the alloy (prevents kinks, can easily be melted out at low heat (water or oil bath or hot air)

-       Heat baths

-       Quick checking of casting moulds as the bismuth content usually leads to extremely low shrinkage

-       Temporary fixing/bonding of materials, as parts can later be separated easily and residue-free

-       As a casting material for instance where the melting temperature of pure tin is too high (avoids burns and prevents damage to moulds)

-       As a casting material for good reproduction of filigree objects (flows well in fine moulding parts and hardly shrinks)